Ted Cruz claims high court gay marriage legalization was ‘clearly wrong’

Sunday - 17/07/2022 22:34
Controversial US Senator Ted Cruz has discussed the possibility of reversing gay marriage legalization, calling the decision “clearly wrong”.

Senator Ted Cruz has argued that the US Supreme Court decision to legalise gay marriage was “clearly wrong”, while discussing the possibility of its reversal.

“So look, Obergefell, like Roe v. Wade, ignored two centuries of our nation’s history,” the Texas Republican said on his show Verdict With Ted Cruz on Saturday.

“Marriage was always an issue that was left to the states.”

Mr Cruz was referencing Obergefell v. Hodges, the landmark decision that guaranteed the right to same-sex marriage nationwide in 2015, the New York Post reports.

Before the Supreme Court made that decision, “some states were moving to allow gay marriage, other states were moving to allow civil partnerships,” Mr Cruz said.

“They were different standards that the states were adopting.”

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Senator Ted Cruz said the decision to legalise gay marriage was ‘overreaching’. Picture: Leah Millis/AFP
Senator Ted Cruz said the decision to legalise gay marriage was ‘overreaching’. Picture: Leah Millis/AFP

Supporters rejoiced after the US Supreme Court handed down its ruling on same-sex marriage in 2015. Picture: Alex Wong/Getty Images
Supporters rejoiced after the US Supreme Court handed down its ruling on same-sex marriage in 2015. Picture: Alex Wong/Getty Images
 

He did acknowledge that its reversal would create massive legal complications.

“You’ve got a ton of people who have entered into gay marriages and it would be more than a little chaotic for the court to do something that somehow disrupted those marriages,” the senator added.

Mr Cruz’s comments followed the court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade in late June, a ruling that made abortion up until foetal viability a constitutional right in America – and left it up to the 50 states to set their own laws on abortion.

Justice Clarence Thomas, in his opinion concurring with the decision to reverse Roe, called for the court to re-examine and potentially overturn rulings that protect gay marriage and access to birth control.

“In future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court’s substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence and Obergefell,” he wrote.
 

Abortion rights activists demonstrate in support of women’s rights in Santa Monica, California. Picture: Ringo Chiu/AFP
Abortion rights activists demonstrate in support of women’s rights in Santa Monica, California. Picture: Ringo Chiu/AFP
 

Thomas was referring to a 1965 ruling, Griswold v. Connecticut, that allowed married couples to access birth control and a 2003 ruling, Lawrence v. Texas, that banned states from outlawing consensual gay sex.

Justice Samuel Alito, however, wrote in the majority opinion overturning Roe: “We emphasise that our decision concerns the constitutional right to abortion and no other right.”

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Justice Brett Kavanaugh added: “Nothing in this opinion should be understood to cast doubt on precedents that do not concern abortion.”

This article originally appeared on the New York Post and was republished with permission

Author: Editors Desk

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 Keywords: United States

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